fxg: One of the key shots is the fly walking over Walt’s glasses? Can you talk about that?
Beck: That is actually my favourite shot, where you see Walt’s eye in extreme close focus, looking very distressed and moving around to the sound of what is obviously a fly in the room and then it lands right in front of him – on his glasses. As he focuses onto the fly, we pull back into focus from his eye onto the fly. This was always designed to be a CG fly. We had a few tracking dots on the glasses. If you look at the original plate it plays beautifully, except that there are six little dots on the glasses where the feet are to go and no fly. We had lots of lighting reference for that. The sound department did such a good job for that shot too, because if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of him rubbing his little legs together. Another challenge with the animation was that flies do a pretty good job of flying but they kind of crash-land a lot of the time. So we’d have to add a little bit of movement after the landing.
– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)
Zoom Info
fxg: One of the key shots is the fly walking over Walt’s glasses? Can you talk about that?
Beck: That is actually my favourite shot, where you see Walt’s eye in extreme close focus, looking very distressed and moving around to the sound of what is obviously a fly in the room and then it lands right in front of him – on his glasses. As he focuses onto the fly, we pull back into focus from his eye onto the fly. This was always designed to be a CG fly. We had a few tracking dots on the glasses. If you look at the original plate it plays beautifully, except that there are six little dots on the glasses where the feet are to go and no fly. We had lots of lighting reference for that. The sound department did such a good job for that shot too, because if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of him rubbing his little legs together. Another challenge with the animation was that flies do a pretty good job of flying but they kind of crash-land a lot of the time. So we’d have to add a little bit of movement after the landing.
– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)
Zoom Info

fxg: One of the key shots is the fly walking over Walt’s glasses? Can you talk about that?

Beck: That is actually my favourite shot, where you see Walt’s eye in extreme close focus, looking very distressed and moving around to the sound of what is obviously a fly in the room and then it lands right in front of him – on his glasses. As he focuses onto the fly, we pull back into focus from his eye onto the fly. This was always designed to be a CG fly. We had a few tracking dots on the glasses. If you look at the original plate it plays beautifully, except that there are six little dots on the glasses where the feet are to go and no fly. We had lots of lighting reference for that. The sound department did such a good job for that shot too, because if you listen carefully you can hear the sound of him rubbing his little legs together. Another challenge with the animation was that flies do a pretty good job of flying but they kind of crash-land a lot of the time. So we’d have to add a little bit of movement after the landing.

– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)

I’m wondering if you can tell me a little bit about what the younger Saul is like and how he’s different from the Saul we know in “Breaking Bad.”
I can’t tell you specifics, because I would get excommunicated from the Catholic Church, as well as every other church where people watch “Breaking Bad.”
He’s going to surprise you. I think when people see Saul from the “Breaking Bad” show, they are seeing the public face of that character, the things he wants to present to the public because he thinks it will get him business, and he had created that persona. So who is the real guy who did that? And I think I would just put it this way. A lot of times people see cynical behavior or a cynical attitude and they think the person is a cynic; in this case maybe Saul Goodman is a cynical guy about the law and stuff. A lot of cynics, I would argue, or people who are called cynics, are truly idealists who just had their feelings hurt. And so I think there’s some philosophy there that maybe carries over in to how Saul became the character that we met on “Breaking Bad.” So that’s as specific as I’ll get. It’s pretty philosophical or whatever, but I would say that… that’s all I can say. He’s a very different guy from what you think. I’ll put it that way. And yet it all makes sense, I think, because the writing is so good, and the writers have really challenged themselves and have come up great from it.
– from Bob Odenkirk’s advice to young people: “Get out of comedy, because it’s about to collapse”

I’m wondering if you can tell me a little bit about what the younger Saul is like and how he’s different from the Saul we know in “Breaking Bad.”

I can’t tell you specifics, because I would get excommunicated from the Catholic Church, as well as every other church where people watch “Breaking Bad.”

He’s going to surprise you. I think when people see Saul from the “Breaking Bad” show, they are seeing the public face of that character, the things he wants to present to the public because he thinks it will get him business, and he had created that persona. So who is the real guy who did that? And I think I would just put it this way. A lot of times people see cynical behavior or a cynical attitude and they think the person is a cynic; in this case maybe Saul Goodman is a cynical guy about the law and stuff. A lot of cynics, I would argue, or people who are called cynics, are truly idealists who just had their feelings hurt. And so I think there’s some philosophy there that maybe carries over in to how Saul became the character that we met on “Breaking Bad.” So that’s as specific as I’ll get. It’s pretty philosophical or whatever, but I would say that… that’s all I can say. He’s a very different guy from what you think. I’ll put it that way. And yet it all makes sense, I think, because the writing is so good, and the writers have really challenged themselves and have come up great from it.

– from Bob Odenkirk’s advice to young people: “Get out of comedy, because it’s about to collapse”

"One guy whose legs we chopped off for the episode “I See You” was a drug assassin trying to kill one of the local law enforcement officials and he lost his legs in the attempt. We put some green leggings on him, removed his legs digitally and replaced the background behind him. As he hauled himself across the floor towards the door, we added in some blood streaks. We used three separate tricks: the hole in the bed to get it done practically, a real amputee for some shots and for other shots we had the real actor and did a digital leg removal. We ended up creating CG bandages as well.
What was also challenging about the shot was the complicated wire removal because this guy had all these tubes that he was wearing and he was ripping them off as he was getting out of the hospital bed. Some of them were getting wrapped around his legs where there weren’t supposed to be any legs! At the same time, it’s a story point that he looks out the window and starts to get very angry, his heart rate goes up and you hear the soundtrack going faster and faster. We had to replace all the contents of the monitors with read-outs that matched his accelerating heart rate. There were lots of wires that had to be re-located. Also, the bed clothing required some 3D work to replace it.”
– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)
Zoom Info
"One guy whose legs we chopped off for the episode “I See You” was a drug assassin trying to kill one of the local law enforcement officials and he lost his legs in the attempt. We put some green leggings on him, removed his legs digitally and replaced the background behind him. As he hauled himself across the floor towards the door, we added in some blood streaks. We used three separate tricks: the hole in the bed to get it done practically, a real amputee for some shots and for other shots we had the real actor and did a digital leg removal. We ended up creating CG bandages as well.
What was also challenging about the shot was the complicated wire removal because this guy had all these tubes that he was wearing and he was ripping them off as he was getting out of the hospital bed. Some of them were getting wrapped around his legs where there weren’t supposed to be any legs! At the same time, it’s a story point that he looks out the window and starts to get very angry, his heart rate goes up and you hear the soundtrack going faster and faster. We had to replace all the contents of the monitors with read-outs that matched his accelerating heart rate. There were lots of wires that had to be re-located. Also, the bed clothing required some 3D work to replace it.”
– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)
Zoom Info

"One guy whose legs we chopped off for the episode “I See You” was a drug assassin trying to kill one of the local law enforcement officials and he lost his legs in the attempt. We put some green leggings on him, removed his legs digitally and replaced the background behind him. As he hauled himself across the floor towards the door, we added in some blood streaks. We used three separate tricks: the hole in the bed to get it done practically, a real amputee for some shots and for other shots we had the real actor and did a digital leg removal. We ended up creating CG bandages as well.

What was also challenging about the shot was the complicated wire removal because this guy had all these tubes that he was wearing and he was ripping them off as he was getting out of the hospital bed. Some of them were getting wrapped around his legs where there weren’t supposed to be any legs! At the same time, it’s a story point that he looks out the window and starts to get very angry, his heart rate goes up and you hear the soundtrack going faster and faster. We had to replace all the contents of the monitors with read-outs that matched his accelerating heart rate. There were lots of wires that had to be re-located. Also, the bed clothing required some 3D work to replace it.”

– from Breaking Bad : Entity FX  (interview with Mat Beck, senior visual effects supervisor)

Bryan Cranston on Twitter: “Florida mom petitions against Toys ‘R Us over Breaking Bad action figures.” I’m so mad, I’m burning my Florida Mom action figure in protest.

Bryan Cranston on Twitter: “Florida mom petitions against Toys ‘R Us over Breaking Bad action figures.” I’m so mad, I’m burning my Florida Mom action figure in protest.

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.

Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.

Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.

Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”
– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu
   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan

"Milton’s Satan is terrifying because he is recognizably human: he exhibits ambition, pride, desire for freedom, and injury at being undervalued. Like Milton’s Satan, Walt is an anti-hero, burningly intelligent and reeking of lust for power.

Walt’s dilemma is the same as Satan’s: how to assert a modicum of control — of free will — against forces larger than oneself. Satan rages against a tyrannical, unjust, uncaring God; Walt battles against the inexplicability of his cancer and a broken health-care system.

Like Milton’s Satan, Walt seeks to reason and justify his rebellion. He invokes art, science, free market rationality, protection of one’s family. In this sense, libertarians and artists alike ought to embrace Walt. He is a radical individual. His product, while problematic, merely feeds demand; demand increases, and so too must production.

Walt risks all to feed a ceaseless, self-destructive desire to be king. For Milton’s Satan, ruling Hell means liberty; for Walt, selling meth means being no one’s bitch. As Milton’s Satan says of Hell, “Here at least / We shall be free.”

– from In Hell, “We Shall Be Free”: On “Breaking Bad” by Michelle Kuo & Albert Wu

   Illustration: Paul Gustave Doré, Paradise Lost - The Fall of Satan

cpnblowfish:

Jesse at work - inktober 5
Made with black, red, pink and blue ballpoint pens + white acrylic paint pen.
Yo, Jesse my old friend, it’s been a while that I didn’t deal with him. This one took way longer than my other inktober drawings - I initially planned to make quick sketches but, oh well, it seems that my love for details is stronger! Plus the reference picture was too much interesting that it worsted to spend several hours on it. I mostly worked like on my pencil drawings - The technique with ballpoint pen is all about pressure on the nib, gently for light shading, strong for dark and to keep a similar stroke. But I had to be very careful too because ink blob could happens in any moment… Otherwise, I had fun and great improvement, but now, I don’t feel the need to keep going inktober, I think it’s a good way to achieve it.

cpnblowfish:

Jesse at work - inktober 5

Made with black, red, pink and blue ballpoint pens + white acrylic paint pen.

Yo, Jesse my old friend, it’s been a while that I didn’t deal with him.
This one took way longer than my other inktober drawings - I initially planned to make quick sketches but, oh well, it seems that my love for details is stronger! Plus the reference picture was too much interesting that it worsted to spend several hours on it. I mostly worked like on my pencil drawings - The technique with ballpoint pen is all about pressure on the nib, gently for light shading, strong for dark and to keep a similar stroke. But I had to be very careful too because ink blob could happens in any moment… Otherwise, I had fun and great improvement, but now, I don’t feel the need to keep going inktober, I think it’s a good way to achieve it.